Texas Rig

The Texas rig is one of the most popular rigs for presenting soft plastic baits in areas where there is dense cover because it rarely snags. It is the ideal “weedless” rig for fishing in submerged vegetation, near underwater stumps, and in rocky areas.

The Texas rig is used primarily for fishing bass, pike and pickerel, but is also effective for targeting other warm water fish species that like to burrow in cover. The Texas rig is especially effective for catching largemouth bass that tend to forage in thick vegetation and weedbeds where other fishing rigs tend to snag.

How to make the Texas Rig

The basic components of the Texas rig include a soft plastic lure, bullet-shaped weight and offset hook. To make the rig, start by threading the bullet-shape weight onto the main fishing line. If you’d like the rig to make noise as it travels through the water, add a noise-producing plastic or glass bead to the line just under the weight. Finally, add a hook to the end the line.

The Texas rig does not require a bead. However, some fishermen like to add a bead because it creates a clicking noise that makes a sound similar to that of a crayfish moving along the bottom. The bead’s bright color can also help the rig be found in cloudy water by feeding fish.

Texas Rig

The final step is to add a plastic worm to your hook. The hook should enter the head area of the soft plastic lure and exit about half way down the body. Now, push the worm up to the top of the hook’s shank and twist it to “lock” the worm onto the rig. Finish by pushing the hook’s point back up into the worm’s body. This enables the hook to travel through the water without snagging. When a fish bites down on the plastic worm, the hook releases from the plastic worm and sets in the fish’s mouth.

The Texas rig can be dressed with a variety of soft plastic baits in order to imitate the natural prey of the target fish species. These include, but are not limited to, craws, lizards, frogs baits, beaver baits, flipping tubs, creature baits, tube baits and baitfish imitators.

The Texas rig can also be made using a slip sinker as opposed to a weight that is afixed in place. Allowing the slip sinker to move up and down the line when fishing in open water creates a natural effect. In extra-thick cover, it is better to place a pegging device or bobber stop above the slip sinker to position it close to the hook and inhibit it from moving up the line. This will help you pull the lure through the cover without snagging or loosing your bait.

The following are recommended hook sizes for different plastic baits used on the Texas rig.

Bait TypeHook Size
Plastic Lizards, 6-inch plastic worms3/0 straight shank
7- to 8-inch plastic worms4/0 straight shank
10-inch or longer plastic worms5/0 straight shank
Beaver baits and craws4/0 EWG (extra-wide gap)
Creature baits5/0 EWG

For Texas rigging the size of your sinker weight should be determined by the depth of the target fish and thickness of cover. The following are just fews suggestions for sinker weights.

Fishing conditionsWeight size
Slow-falling lure for shallow water1/8-ounce
Sparse cover with depth less than 15'1/4- to 3/8-ounce
Thick cover with depth over 20'1/2-ounce
Thick vegetation1 1/2-ounce

The Texas rig can also be made using a slip sinker as opposed to a weight that is afixed in place. Allowing the slip sinker to move up and down the line when fishing in open water creates a natural effect. In extra-thick cover, it is better to place a pegging device or bobber stop above the slip sinker to position it close to the hook and inhibit it from moving up the line. This will help you pull the lure through the cover without snagging or loosing your bait.